Social Media 101

Written by Josh Spector - Digital marketing consultant. Collector and sharer of ideas.

It’s time to teach social media to high school students.

While some adults who don’t understand social media — ironically because they were never taught it —still dismiss it as a novelty or distraction, the reality is social media has become a force of incredible power, change, and business.

It’s changed our world and its importance is only growing.

So much so that I can’t think of anything more important to teach our next generation of leaders, innovators, entrepreneurs, and working class citizens than how to create and interpret social media.

If the job of our education system is to prepare students to succeed in the “real world,” then teaching them social media skills should be a prerequisite.

While most teenagers already use social media, I doubt many understand the intricacies of how social media works.

We’ve handed a world-changing technology to a new generation without giving them any instructions on how to use it.

For example, how many teens understand the impact their social posts can have on themselves, others, and the future?

The class could explore everything from self-image to bullying through a social media lens, and help kids understand the impact their news feeds and notifications have on their perception of their life and world.

In learning why people post what they post, how people react on social platforms, and how habits (good and bad) are formed, students would acquire a set of skills to help them understand and deal with the scenarios they face on a daily basis.

Taken a step further, the class could also explore the role social media plays in marketing and advertising — how social platforms use psychology to attract and retain users, and how advertisers use those platforms to reach and influence consumers.

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It’s important for kids to know who Henry Ford was, but it’s just as important for them to understand how the things they use every day came to be, why they’re hooked on them, and what they mean for the future.
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Girl Uses Google Translate To Invite Her New Classmate Who Was Isolated To Sit With Her At Lunch

Elementary school student Rafael Anaya had just moved from Mexico to California, and, not knowing English, was having a hard time finding new friends – until one girl used google translate to reach out and write a letter to him. A 10-year-old classmate Amanda Moore saw the boy eating lunch alone, and didn’t think it was right. See, Amanda is a girl who believes that everyone should have a buddy, so she used technology to invite Rafael to have lunch with her. Her letter reads: ‘Would you like to sit with me today? Look for me and I will show you where I sit. We can color or simply tell scary stories. Thank you for your time, signed Amanda.’

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Connecting Youth With Nature - Free Suzuki Foundation Guides
Nature as a Classroom pdf   Connecting With Nature for Kindergarten pdf   Connecting With Nature for grades 4-6 pdf   Connecting With Nature for grades 7 & 8 pdf   Studies show spending time outdoors helps students do better in school by improving memory, problem-solving and creativity. Children who spend time in nature are also healthier and more likely to care for nature as adults.  Teachers across Canada agree! They’ve downloaded more than 10,000 copies of our educational guides. From coast to coast to coast, educators are taking their students outside. And they’re reporting that it’s good for students and those who teach them!  You can foster a nature connection in your students with the free lesson plans and resources on this page. All are available in French and English.  The Nature as a Classroom guide answers common questions about how to make outdoor learning fun and accessible.  The Connecting With Nature guides include comprehensive classroom and outdoor lesson plans for kindergarten through Grade 8.  The Connecting With Nature guides were created and written by David Suzuki Foundation staff, Toronto District School Board educators and staff, and students from Nipissing University’s Schulich School of Education.   read more >

Nature as a Classroom pdf
Connecting With Nature for Kindergarten pdf
Connecting With Nature for grades 4-6 pdf
Connecting With Nature for grades 7 & 8 pdf

Studies show spending time outdoors helps students do better in school by improving memory, problem-solving and creativity. Children who spend time in nature are also healthier and more likely to care for nature as adults.

Teachers across Canada agree! They’ve downloaded more than 10,000 copies of our educational guides. From coast to coast to coast, educators are taking their students outside. And they’re reporting that it’s good for students and those who teach them!

You can foster a nature connection in your students with the free lesson plans and resources on this page. All are available in French and English.

The Nature as a Classroom guide answers common questions about how to make outdoor learning fun and accessible.

The Connecting With Nature guides include comprehensive classroom and outdoor lesson plans for kindergarten through Grade 8.

The Connecting With Nature guides were created and written by David Suzuki Foundation staff, Toronto District School Board educators and staff, and students from Nipissing University’s Schulich School of Education.

read more >

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Why Learning Outside in Nature Is Good for Teachers and Students

Children belong outdoors. We know this intuitively, but now an extensive and ever-growing body of research supports it. Kids who spend time outside every day are healthier, happier, more creative, less stressed and more alert than those who don't. Several recent studies even show time in nature or green space helps reduce ADHD symptoms.

But what about teachers who take children outdoors, contributing to their learning and growth? More alert, calm and creative students are a plus to them as educators. Could they also benefit as individuals from taking students outside every day?

read more >

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Science is for everyone, kids included

Now, I want to tell you a story about seeing differently, and all new perceptions begin in the same way. They begin with a question. The problem with questions is they create uncertainty. Now, uncertainty is a very bad thing. It's evolutionarily a bad thing. If you're not sure that's a predator, it's too late. Okay? (Laughter) Even seasickness is a consequence of uncertainty. Right? If you go down below on a boat, your inner ears are you telling you you're moving. Your eyes, because it's moving in register with the boat, say I'm standing still. Your brain cannot deal with the uncertainty of that information, and it gets ill. The question "why?" is one of the most dangerous things you can do, because it takes you into uncertainty. And yet, the irony is, the only way we can ever do anything new is to step into that space. So how can we ever do anything new? Well fortunately, evolution has given us an answer, right? And it enables us to address even the most difficult of questions. The best questions are the ones that create the most uncertainty. They're the ones that question the things we think to be true already. Right? It's easy to ask questions about how did life begin, or what extends beyond the universe, but to question what you think to be true already is really stepping into that space.

3:29 So what is evolution's answer to the problem of uncertainty? It's play. Now play is not simply a process. Experts in play will tell you that actually it's a way of being. Play is one of the only human endeavors where uncertainty is actually celebrated. Uncertainty is what makes play fun. Right? It's adaptable to change. Right? It opens possibility, and it's cooperative. It's actually how we do our social bonding, and it's intrinsically motivated. What that means is that we play to play. Play is its own reward.

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‘Bill Nye Saves The World’ To Give Netflix a New Take on Talk Shows

Bill Nye is making a return to TV, via a brand new series for Netflix. The erstwhile bow-tied host, known best to a generation as “The Science Guy,” will star in the streaming service’s “Bill Nye Saves the World,” a new talk show set to launch in Spring 2017.

The official synopsis, from Netflix: “Each episode will tackle a topic from a scientific point of view, dispelling myths, and refuting anti-scientific claims that may be espoused by politicians, religious leaders or titans of industry.”

Read more at Indiewire >

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Simple Science fun
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